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Residents Ask for Sewer Extension Cost Relief

As neighborhood nears a consensus on installation, some balk at costs for roadwork.

Winding Way resident David Brooks said more of his neighbors will agree to a proposed sewer extension if the township can make the project more cost efficient than installing new septic systems. Credit: John Patten
Winding Way resident David Brooks said more of his neighbors will agree to a proposed sewer extension if the township can make the project more cost efficient than installing new septic systems. Credit: John Patten
Residents of Winding Way and Spring Valley Drive have been considering a proposal to proceed with sewer connections in their neighborhood.

But just as the number consenting to the work is almost at the level needed for the project to proceed is reached, some are asking the township to try and help reduce the projected costs.

The township wants 70 percent of the residents to sign agreements for a special assessment to pay for the sewer extension, and township Health Officer Glen Belnay told the Township Committee on Tuesday that he has 22 of the 34 needed to advance the project.

"I think we're approaching the consensus the committee is looking for of 70 percent," Dr. Belnay said at Tuesday's meeting.

He called the project a "win for everybody," since—if approved—the sewers would replace septic systems approaching 30 years old.

Winding Way resident David Brooks said the residents understand the estimated $850,000 they will be assessed for the sewer work and connections, but were concerned about the estimated $400,000 for road paving and repair.

"Right now, the cost of putting in the sewer is about equivalent to putting in a new septic system," Brooks said. "So, a number of the people we spoke with are just saying the cost is too much.

"We believe with a little help from you folks, we can lower that cost to each of us and get those hesitant to sign up to reach the needed majority," he said.

Brooks noted when residents in the Claremont area recently had sewers installed, the cost of milling and paving the streets was not passed on to residents—although he did note Winding Way and Spring Valley Drive were repaved only six years ago.

The Claremont work, completed in November 2011, used a state financing program that enabled the township to borrow the money for the work from the state and assess the property owners directly for the cost.

Mayor Frank DelCore told Brooks the committee will discuss what could be done to reduce the costs of the road work.
 
spokey January 13, 2014 at 12:20 PM
Those numbers don't make sense. If 22 are signed of the 34 needed, that is far from "almost at the level needed for the project to proceed". It's less than 65%. Now if 34 is the total and not the number needed, then it is almost there as you would only need 24. So is the 34 the needed (the 70%) or the total number of residents? If 34 is the 70% needed I guess the total must be 47 or 48. I had to get a new septic last year. A large mound with pumps in the middle of the yard and multiple tanks. If the total is 48 residences their estimate of cost is higher than what mine cost but in the ballpark. But if the total is 34 that is way higher than my cost last year.
watchful one January 13, 2014 at 01:15 PM
for what it's worth, I count 32 residences total on those two roads. Go to google maps satellite and you can count along with me. at this point, I am assuming the reporter meant to write "22 of 24", not "22 of 34", since there are only 32 houses there total.

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